Thursday, 02 February 2012
If you are having difficulty opening or downloading the February Theodore Turley Family Newsletter, please give this version a try.  If this doesn't work, please send an email to turleyfamilyorg@gmail.com to get a copy of the newsletter emailed to you.

Sorry for the inconvenience!
~ Hilary

February 2012 TTFO Newsletter.pdf (2.6 MB)
Thursday, 02 February 2012 18:40:03 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [4]  | 
Wednesday, 28 March 2012 05:49:22 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
es. Install it in its own folder and fnocigure the directory it resides in as an application in IIS.Some hosting providers may not allow the level of trust used in BlogEngine.NET by default. If you receive an error similar to: * "Parser Error Message: It is an error to use a section registered as allowDefinition='MachineToApplication' beyond application level.",You can try one of the following to resolve the issue: * Comment out the "trust" line in web.config * Ask your hosting provider if they can fnocigure the directory where BlogEngine.Net is installed as a virtual directory. * Ask your hosting provider to verify that the directory has been fnocigured as an application in IIS.
Thursday, 29 March 2012 22:01:31 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Once I received a call offering me a decent sum to turn for a pianist for a chamber music concert. I was pleased to finally get paid for something I'd been doing pro bono for years. I got there early and met with the pianist. He seemed high-strung but some people are before a concert. I clarified repeat issues with him and he assured me he was a clear nodder.The concert began and I soon saw why he was so high-strung; his mediocre technique and limited musicality made him a bad choice to play the well-known Beethoven and Brahms trios he was tackling (almost literally, football player style). We got towards the end of the first page and he did not nod. I figured, Maybe he likes memorize the beginning of the next page and have late turns. Nope as we reached the last two beats he abruptly turned his heard toward me and, in a low, gruff voice barked, Turn! This disagreeable ritual was repeated for most of the performance. I thought it might have been less disruptive for him and the audience to nod as he said. No such luck. I made it through and didn't mess it up, but he really unnerved me and I dare say I was very deserving of my pay that evening.

Thursday, 29 March 2012 22:49:12 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Once I received a call offering me a decent sum to turn for a pianist for a chamber music concert. I was pleased to finally get paid for something I'd been doing pro bono for years. I got there early and met with the pianist. He seemed high-strung but some people are before a concert. I clarified repeat issues with him and he assured me he was a clear nodder.The concert began and I soon saw why he was so high-strung; his mediocre technique and limited musicality made him a bad choice to play the well-known Beethoven and Brahms trios he was tackling (almost literally, football player style). We got towards the end of the first page and he did not nod. I figured, Maybe he likes memorize the beginning of the next page and have late turns. Nope as we reached the last two beats he abruptly turned his heard toward me and, in a low, gruff voice barked, Turn! This disagreeable ritual was repeated for most of the performance. I thought it might have been less disruptive for him and the audience to nod as he said. No such luck. I made it through and didn't mess it up, but he really unnerved me and I dare say I was very deserving of my pay that evening.

Thursday, 29 March 2012 23:36:10 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
Once I received a call offering me a decent sum to turn for a pianist for a chamber music concert. I was pleased to finally get paid for something I'd been doing pro bono for years. I got there early and met with the pianist. He seemed high-strung but some people are before a concert. I clarified repeat issues with him and he assured me he was a clear nodder.The concert began and I soon saw why he was so high-strung; his mediocre technique and limited musicality made him a bad choice to play the well-known Beethoven and Brahms trios he was tackling (almost literally, football player style). We got towards the end of the first page and he did not nod. I figured, Maybe he likes memorize the beginning of the next page and have late turns. Nope as we reached the last two beats he abruptly turned his heard toward me and, in a low, gruff voice barked, Turn! This disagreeable ritual was repeated for most of the performance. I thought it might have been less disruptive for him and the audience to nod as he said. No such luck. I made it through and didn't mess it up, but he really unnerved me and I dare say I was very deserving of my pay that evening.

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